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Poem: The tale of Rosie and Sally

in Philosophies/Poetry by

narcissism (n.) 1905, from German Narzissismus, coined 1899 (in “Die sexuellen Perversitäten”), by German psychiatrist Paul Näcke (1851-1913), on a comparison suggested 1898 by Havelock Ellis, from Greek Narkissos, name of a beautiful youth in mythology (Ovid, “Metamorphoses,” iii.370) who fell in love with his own reflection in a spring and was turned to the flower narcissus (q.v.). Coleridge used the word in a letter from 1822. (From Online Etymology Dictionary)

But already Krishna, enamoured of himself, had resolved to experience lust for his own self; he manifested his own Nature in the cow-herd girls and enjoyed them. [Karapatri, “Lingopasana-rahasya,” Siddhanta, II, 1941-2]

 

unknown-children

The tale of Rosie and Sally

Rosie used to hide
behind the door
and listen to her
mother praise
her sister, while
putting her down
to her aunts:

They would shake
their heads at
the sight of her;
pass judgement on
any little act
of childhood,
tantrums or bother.

Rosie’s father was
like a coarse wall
with hooks for hands,
and a spout for
bitterness;
it made him sick
still in his youth.

Little Rosie grew up
quite pretty and had
many boyfriends whom
she’d discard unless
they were broken
perhaps
just like her.

Magnetic, she knew
how to make one feel
special, all the while
fishing for praise;
feeling unhappy unless
an audience watched
and loved her face.

When she gave birth
to the fruit of
a doomed affair,
a daughter needing
her genuine love,
Rosie didn’t know
how to act.

She passed on
to the little girl
what her own parents
had taught her –
the still neglected
child trying now
to raise her own daughter:

Sally the punching
bag for misplaced
rage, made guilty for
the tears still
springing from
Rosie’s secret
cavernous place.

Sally used to sit
inside her room
and listen to her
mother yell
at her, while
her stepfather joined
in like a choir:

They would shake
their heads at
the sight of her;
pass judgement on
any little act
of childhood,
tantrums or bother.

Little Sally grew up
less pretty but had
many boyfriends whom
she’d discard unless
they were broken
perhaps
just like her.

Magnetic, she knew
how to make one feel
special, all the while
sowing for praise;
feeling unhappy because
though her words echoed far,
she’d never be known for her face.

20s-shoes

An aspiring social scientist and former newspaper reporter, an avid eater, a pseudo-philosopher and poet, an occasion-propelled singer, a semi-professional socializer, a movie addict, a Brazilian-American nomad. In this space, she will share some of her experiences and (mis)adventures regarding various topics, but with special attention to travel, entertainment and lifestyle.

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