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Reviews - page 9

Poem review (and musings): Dear Truman

in Poetry/Reviews
Inspired by Ana Beatriz Ribeiro's poem "Dear Truman" posted on this webzine, Christijan Broerse writes a review drawing from works by famous literary figures of the past while reflecting on the state of contemporary life and the pervasiveness of social media, the commodification of personal moments. https://leipglo.com
Literature and modern times. Public Domain Photo, Pixabay.

“The review is interesting in that it becomes a stepping stone to shed light on his contemporary world.”

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“Love” according to Judd Apatow

in Reviews/TV
Now, Apatow presents Love to Netflix audiences. At first, I refused to watch it precisely because of the title. The theme is trite, to say the least. But I should've known better. As I'd come to find out, Love offers a more realistic portrayal of love than pretty much any romantic comedy I've seen before, on the big or small screen. Apatow, the series's writer and producer, has outdone himself. https://leipglo.com
Gillian Jacobs and Paul Rust star in the Netflix series "Love." Image from http://screencrush.com/netflix-judd-apatow-love-photos-teaser-premiere/

The final season is now out on Netflix!

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Strong Ladies on DVD

in Movies/Reviews

sometimes we are stronger than we think

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Movie Review: “Hail, Caesar!”

in Culture / Entertainment/Movies/Reviews

Any movie by the Coen Brothers is hotly anticipated by movie buffs all over the world, particularly when casting actors of an established guild such as George Clooney and Scarlett Johansson. It’s a mixed bag, though, Ana says.

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Macbeth is on the Flicks

in Movies/Reviews

Our Kapuczino gives us a glowing review of Macbeth (2015) with some enriching historical context.

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The butchering of Shakespeare’s “Dream”

in Reviews/Theater
Leipzig city center. Photo: Stefan Hopf
Leipzig city center. Photo: Stefan Hopf

Max pleads with Leipzig’s Schauspiel to leave Shakespeare and other famous playwrights alone and instead market their modern plays, dramatically different from classical versions, in another way.

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