History

Rediscovering Görlitz’s Jewish history

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The Eastern Saxon city of Görlitz was once a thriving Jewish community in the greater area of Upper Lusatia (Oberlausitz). Persecution by the Nazis decimated the community entirely during the Shoah. Nowadays the city is divided into a German part, Görlitz, and a Polish part, Zgorzelec. A young American woman living in Görlitz, Lauren Leiderman,

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Book launch: The Poesie Book of Eva Goldberg

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The poesie book of Eva Goldberg traces the escape of the Goldberg family prior to the start of the Second World War. Their flight began in Görlitz and lead via the Netherlands and Great Britain to the USA. Eva Goldberg grew up in Görlitz and had a very happy childhood. She often traveled to Amsterdam

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For those who love history but hate the war

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“Lucky he who was taught history,“ as the saying I remember from my school years goes. I thought it was attributed to Plutarch, but my internet search offers up the name of Euripides. Well, I was a very negligent pupil, so I wouldn’t know. And because I was so negligent, today I regret not having

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A Literary Retrospective: If Beale Street Could Talk

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I guess it can’t be too often that two people can laugh and make love, too, make love because they are laughing, laugh because they’re making love. The love and the laughter come from the same place: but not many people go there. (If Beale Street Could Talk, p. 15) Love, its absence, and its

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Resurrecting the abandoned: Castle Esterházy of Galanta

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LeipGlo contributor Lenka Šerešová shares the history and present of her hometown castle: Schloss Esterhazy of Galanta. She delves into its storied past as well as the current initiative that aims to resurrect the castle's former glory.

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Clipped marble wings: From cemetery to Friedenspark

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LeipGlo contributor and blogger Mariam Goshadze takes a deep dive into the storied history of one of Leipzig's most beloved recreational areas: the Friedenspark.

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